DIY Compost Tea Bucket

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DIY Compost Tea Bucket www.homesteadlady.comHomestead Gentleman speaks (yes, I let him have his say every now and then!):

Have you ever thought what your garden would order at the local snooty organic restaurant?  Maybe some fresh rain water to drink for starters, then some sunshine as an appetizer?  Most definitely the main course would have to be Chicken Poop Soup…

Here is our DIY Compost Tea Bucket design that you can easily make in a matter of a few minutes with the right tools and parts from your local home improvement store.

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DIY Compost Tea Bucket:

Materials:DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com - parts

One good bucket

Rubber gasket sheet (3” by 5”)

½” PVC parts:

Elbow

Adapter (glue to male thread)

Adapter (glue to female thread)

Ball valve

1 ft schedule 40 pipe

Straw

Bunch of chickens

Tools:

Drill with 7/8” hole saw bit.  Be sure to size it to fit over the male threaded adapter

Rubber gasket sheet

Ratcheting PVC cutter

Razor knife or scissors

Pliers or adjustable wrenches

Assembling your compost tea bucket:

DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com - drilling the spout for the hole

DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com

 

Drill a 7/8” hole near the bottom of the bucket on the side 1” up from the bottom of the inside.

 

 

 

DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com - DIY GasketsUse the same bit to cut holes in the rubber gasket sheet one inch apart.  Use a razor knife or scissors to cut out two gaskets with the holes centered.

 

 

 

DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com

 

 

Place the two gaskets over the threads of the threaded adapter and place the threads through the hole just cut from the inside of the bucket.

 

DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com - adding the spoutScrew the two adapters together sandwiching the gaskets inside the bucket wall.DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com

 

Cut a couple of 2” sections of pipe and a 3” section.  Insert a 2” pipe section into the outer adapter, then the ball valve, then another 2” pipe section, then an elbow and lastly the 3” pipe section pointing downward.  I chose not to glue the joints because there is not enough pressure to make it come apart.  I can then dismantle it at the end of the season and store the parts inside the bucket.DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com - assembling valve

 

Here is what the valve setup looks like.

Finished DIY Compost Tea Bucket!  Test Drive…

DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com - finished valvePlace some water in the bucket with the ball valve closed and check the effectiveness of the gasket seal.  If it leaks, use a couple pairs pliers to tighten the adapters.  When it passes without leaking, empty the water and place enough medium sized stones to cover bottom, about 6 inches of straw on top of that and about 6 inches of chicken poop (or a chunk of whatever you shoveled out of your coop) on top of the whole thing.  Place the setup on a table or wall outside near a water source in a sunny location.  Add water up to the top and cover.  Wait a couple of hours or a day.  Place a watering can below the spigot and open the ball valve.  You can refill the same bucket with new water until it runs “clear” and you know all the good poop is gone.  Empty the bucket contents into your compost pile and do it all again.  Only a gardener can appreciate the smell of the product that will leave your plants wanting to give you a tip for the best meal they have ever feasted upon.DIY Compost Tea Bucket - www.homesteadlady.com

Bon Appetite Garden!

Ah, my man knows how to please!  For more information on actually brewing your compost tea you can Google the topic or go here to begin with.   There are a lot of different methods and recipes but the bottom line is that you don’t want to brew disease and death to your plants so adequate turnover is really important – brew it and use it!

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This post was shared at Wildcrafting Wednesday, Clever Chicks Blog Hop, Simple and Joyful, Simple Living Wednesday, Frugally Sustainable, My Turn For Us, From The Farm Hop, Farm Fun FridayClever Chicks Blog Hop, Mostly Homemade Mondays,  Adventures of a DIY Mom,  The Homeacre hop,  Fabulously Frugal Thursday , Mountain Woman Rendezvous , Small Footprint Friday , Rural Wisdom and Know How and was FEATURED at The Backyard Farming Connection Hopfeaturedbutton-2

 

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7 thoughts on “DIY Compost Tea Bucket

  1. This is absolutely ingenous! Can’t wait to make one. So, you’re supposed to pour it on the compost and not on your plants? Thanks for the info and great pictures as a tutorial! Vickie

    1. Glad it was helpful! The idea is, you’re brewing your compost like you would a cup of tea. The bucket is your tea pot and the spigot is your spout. You put your “tea leaves” (your chicken poop with maybe some straw in it, compost from your compost bin or whatever muck you have) and then add water and let it steep. When it’s sat for awhile you empty your pot through the spout into your tea cup (your watering can) and pour it onto your plants for a stinky but nutritious tea party! You can put more water in your “pot” and re-use your first “tea leaves” until the water that comes out of your spout runs clear. After that, dump your first “tea leaves” and refill your “pot” with more chicken poop muck. Goat poop works nicely, too. Any barnyard poop will do!

    1. You could use a similar width metal pipe, but make sure you use some kind of washer if you find the metal and plastic bucket don’t bond well and it leaks. Although, come to think of it, it probably wouldn’t leak much and, in this case, a little leaking might be beneficial. 🙂 I have struggles with plastic and plastic type products, too. Fortunately, a plant’s root system is a great filter for many things. Ever pray over your food? We do and contaminants are a big reason why.

    1. So glad it was helpful! We usually have around three going during the growing season and put them around the gardens for easy access. You end up getting it on you no matter what you do but at least you don’t have to tote it as far if it’s got it’s own space in the garden. 🙂

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