Fabric Scrap Craft Wreaths for Any Holiday

Here’s an easy, DIY, no sew fabric scrap craft that’s great for kids and grown-ups. Use up some of your fabric stash to make these wreaths that work as a garland, napkin holders or ornaments for any holiday. Bonus, they make great handmade gifts for any occasion! fabric scraps and wreaths

These wreaths are a featured simple craft in our upcoming book Homestead Holidays. If you are are feeling the need to bring your family together this year with good food, great traditions and homemade living, be sure to sign up to learn about the release of Homestead Holidays. We can’t wait to share this book with you!

Supplies for Fabric Scrap Craft Wreaths

You only need three items to make these wreaths:

  • Fabric scissors
  • Fabric scraps
  • Small wreaths

You will also need rustic or cotton twine if you want to make a garland or create a loop at the top of each wreath to make it an ornament.

>>>>—Click here to learn to make your own EASY grapevine wreaths—<<<<

Prepare Your Fabric Scraps

Pick your occasion or holiday and determine a color scheme. Most holidays have their own color scheme already. White, blue and gold for Hanukkah; black and orange for Halloween, etc.

For multi-colored fabric scraps, here’s some advice on color selection. If you have a multi-colored piece of cloth and can’t decide which color pile it should go into, try this trick I learned from a quilting teacher of mine: Close your eyes and hold the cloth in front of you. Open your eyes and quickly focus on the piece of cloth. Whichever color you see first, is the color group it should join.

Cut your Fabric Scraps

In order to avoid fraying, use pinking shears to cut your fabric strips with a half an inch width. You can cut them wider, if you’d prefer, which will cover the wreaths quicker. However, you won’t have room for as many colors.

I recommend that you cut your fabric scrap strips at least 6 inches long for ease of tying, especially if children are doing this craft. On that note, here is a short video to show the basic steps for making these wreaths. Then, you can follow the written instructions below.

3 Easy Steps for Fabric Scrap Craft Wreaths

  1. Pick up a wreath and tie on your first strip. Use a simple double knot.
  2. Keep tying on strips in whatever pattern you’ve designed until you run out of fabric strips.
  3. Clip the tails of your strips 1/2″ – 1″ inch from the knot on each strip; the longer the tail, the shaggier your ornament will appear.

fabric scrap wreath and scissors

A Few More Tips

  • Whatever strip combination you settle on, make sure you have enough strips to repeat your pattern all the way around your wreath. FYI, I’ve made emergency pattern substitutions mid-wreath and it usually blends beautifully.
  • You may want to leave small gaps between fabric scraps so that you can see a bit of the wreath showing through.
  • Count on 5-10 minutes of assembly time per wreath for adults; maybe double that for children.

fabric scrap wreaths plus Christmas tag

To Use Fabric Scrap Wreaths

As I said, these make nice napkin wreaths, especially for a rustic fall table or a breezy summer picnic.

They also make lovely handmade gifts. To give these scrap fabric wreaths as gifts, I usually batch them in groups of three or five because odd numbers are visually appealing. 

To Make a Garland

These wreaths make simple ornaments, or they can be tied together to make a garland. To do that:

  1. Cut a 6 foot length of twine or rope.
  2. Tie a loop at each end of the twine. These loops will attach to hooks or nails when you hang the garland. 
  3. Tie each fabric scrap wreath onto the twine individually so that you can slide them around where you want them once you’ve hung the garland. Natural wreaths are individual in size and weight, so you’ll probably need to adjust each wreath to balance the garland.

fabric scrap wreath garlands

Other Fabric Scrap Resources

If you STILL have fabric scraps left over after this project, here are some other things you can do with them.

Fabric Scrap Craft Resources

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